Guy Pearce Talks about Rob and ‘The Rover’

Another interview with Guy Pearce from The Sunday Morning Herald

Guy Pearce has given a glimpse of what to expect from The Rover, the futuristic film he finished shooting with Robert Pattinson in outback South Australia last month.

Director David Michod’s keenly-anticipated follow-up to Animal Kingdom is “an unusual story” set in a world gone wrong in the near future.

“It’s a military state now, it’s every man for himself a little bit, it’s a very bleak kind of world,” says Pearce, who’s about to reach cinemas as the villain in Iron Man 3.

In The Rover, the Australian star plays the title role, a damaged man named Eric with nothing left to live for. Trying to track down a dangerous gang, he meets a young stranger, Rey (Pattinson), and they forge an uneasy alliance.

“[He’s] somebody he has no interest in,” Pearce says. “He’s purely using him to get where he needs to go. So through this bleak … world, there’s a little connection that’s kind of made, which on some level you might think would be a positive thing for this character.

“But on some level it actually makes things worse for him – to really believe that there’s some sense of love in the world or any sense of humanity or compassion. So it’s a pretty bleak story.”

As filming finished in the small town of Marree, almost 700 kilometres north of Adelaide, Pattinson said he wanted to be part of The Rover because “it was a startlingly original script, and it was one of those parts where you read it and you think, ‘I’d love to do this, but I know I’m never going to get it’.”

To play Rey, the Twilight star was dressed as unkempt and unshaven, with make-up to discolour his teeth.

Pattinson says his character, an American who has come to Australia with his brother (played by Scoot McNairy), is “the kind of person who has been brought up to believe they’re incapable of living independently. Someone has always been looking after him.”

The two central characters, Eric and Rey, have a shifting relationship that Pattinson described as “strange and disturbing.”
It’s a film, expected to be out later this year, that seems to have echoes of the classic post-apocalyptic Australian film Mad Max.

”Not as camp though,” says Pearce, was also in Animal Kingdom.”Mad Max is great, don’t get me wrong. But it’s heightened in a way, whereas this is pretty earnest.”

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Amazing Story of How Rob Saved the Alligator from his 2011 Vanity Fair Photoshoot

 

“Just thought I would share the rest of the story with you all… Well, we all know this picture right? I was visiting Insta-gator in Louisiana last weekend with some fellow twilighters and happened to spot it on the wall. I raced over to it and, although the pic doesn’t show it clearly, the paper above the pic says that the alligator, appropriately named, Hollywood, lives at the ranch and that if you ask the tour guide, you can meet him!!!! I immediately went into stealth mode knocking people over trying to find the guide because anything that touched Rob, I MUST TOUCH! Anyway, finally found the guide, who we had nicknamed Marshmallow Man, because he fed the gators marshmallows and because he was hot, and he acted like he didn’t know what I was talking about, all braun, no brains, I guess. He told us to go ask the short, red-headed guy. So I did, and do you know what he told me? He said, “Hollywood’s not here anymore. Rob paid to have him released back into the wild. It’s the only time we’ve ever done that.” Needless to say, tears started to form, not because I didn’t get to meet the gator, but because our Rob is that sweet! I cried and love him even more if that’s possible! And that my friends, is the rest of the story.”

 

Kristen at the 2013 KCAs – Videos and Pics

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Videos

New Kristen Interview with AZ Central

Let’s face it, if you’re Kristen Stewart, you’re forever going to be known as the actress from the “Twilight” movies.

That’s what happens when you’re the face of a franchise. But Stewart has also done some interesting smaller films, such as “The Cake Eaters,” “Adventureland” and “The Runaways” (playing a young Joan Jett).

“On the Road,” director Walter Salles’ version of the famous Jack Kerouac book, offers Stewart another chance to step away from Bella Swan. She plays Marylou, ex-wife of the character based on Neal Cassady (played by Garrett Hedlund). Stewart talked about that and what it was like to balance life between blockbusters.

Question: You’ve done huge movies and small ones. This one is somewhere in-between. Do they feel different when you’re making them?

Answer: It definitely doesn’t feel like an indie move that we really have to really peddle to get people to know about it. The nature of the story, I think, people have been waiting for it for decades, so the people who have any investment in it whatsoever, anybody who wants to see it, probably would have known about it.


Q: This is one of those books that for so long was considered not filmable. Did that add pressure?

A: Oh absolutely, my god. Walter, I mean, how many people spend years making a documentary in search of a possible film? He wasn’t even confident that he was going to make the movie. He was just satisfied and driven to research it and think about maybe putting a movie together. The honor that this thing is steeped in, it is hard to touch. The amount of work that it takes to make yourself feel validated, to even be there, to even consider helping out, is crazy — absolutely for me, unprecedented.

Q: A movie version has been talked about for years.

A: I think to look at the list of actors that came before you (who were discussed for the film) and go, wow, so those years passed you by. And then the next set of actors, they missed out. And so, is this actually going to come together with us? Is this actually going to happen?

Q: Wouldn’t it just stink to be one of the ones who missed out?

A: Oh god, it would be horrible. We weren’t completely sold that this movie was going to happen until we were literally standing on set, shooting it. Even throughout rehearsal it’s like, gosh, is this actually going to happen? It would have been the most painful, horrible experience. But fairly expected at the same time. I think it’s more surprising that we actually went through with it.

Q: How do you prepare for a role like this?

A: I think the only way to really satisfy anyone who loves “On the Road” with a film version is to genuinely have real experiences and hope that the research you’ve done and your love for the book finds its way into your body and into your bones, rather than through line readings, through pointed, planned-out scenes that you recall from the book. But everyone has a different experience reading that book. I think the point is to watch people surprise themselves rather than package and deliver a story to you.

Q: Does the reception of the film matter to you? Or of any film?

A: As soon as you’re really worried about how something is going to be consumed and at what level. … As an actor you should usually be thinking ahead. You should be looking in front of you instead of behind you. If the experience of making the movie wasn’t enough and you sort of need this validation at the end of the process, then you’re enjoying things for different reasons than I am.

Q: This is the second time that you likely will be associated with characters in famous books. Is that strange, that some people will think of you when reading it?

A: Yeah. It’s pretty mind-blowing. The other day they brought in a bunch of copies of “On the Road” for us to sign. The fact that I was even signing my name on that book really blew my mind. It’s crazy.

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